Interview with Blaine Bershad, 2001
Interview with Blaine Bershad, 2001
Installation with 10 minute audio piece, FM broadcast, portable radios

Between 1995 and 2001, I produced a series of site-specific audio pieces based upon interviews with architects that play with the formats and conventions of radio documentary. The works were made for a variety of spaces, including PS1 Museum in Queens, the Visitor's Center to a 700-year-old Irish Castle, and a 1920's art-deco cinema in Glasgow, Scotland.

In each case, an audio interview was recorded with an architect during a site visit to the building. The interview was edited with music in the style of a radio documentary, then played back, usually through one or more portable radios situated throughout the building. Typically, visitors come across a radio that has the appearance of having been left behind by someone working within the space. Listening, however, it becomes clear that the sounds are addressing the building in which the listener is standing. The resulting sense of intimacy, collapsing the distance normally inherent to radio broadcast, is an important aspect of how the works function. By only playing back at the site of their recording (their 'broadcasts' emanating no further than the site's four walls) the pieces retain a sense of play and ultimately elude verification.

'Interview with Blaine Bershad' was based upon an interview with the senior partner of a gallery and architecture firm in Somerville, MA. The interview explores the use of distortion in architecture to foreground an experiential approach to design - one geared around the intimate physical and temporal experience of space. The piece was presented as a mini-FM broadcast emitted from an antenna mounted on one of the main structural columns in the gallery, and picked up by portable radios placed around the space. CD copies of the audio piece, signed by artist and architect, were offered as an edition for sale during the exhibition.